think-eat-save

OZHARVEST BRISBANE TEAMS UP AGAIN WITH GOOD FOOD MONTH

Posted by on July 5, 2016

OzHarvest Brisbane is thrilled to be named the official charity partner for Brisbane Times Good Food Month presented by Citi for the third year running. OzHarvest will offer food-lovers events and experiences that not only taste good, but are also good for the soul.

All events will raise essential funds for OzHarvest Brisbane to continue rescuing surplus food to feed people in need.

Take part in a number of foodie events with soul during the month of July, including the upcoming Think.Eat.Save event to be held at St Stephen’s Cathedral on Monday, 25 July where 1000 people will be fed a delicious, free hot meal prepared from quality rescued food that would otherwise have ended up in landfill.

Collaborating with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the UN’s Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Global Initiative on Food Loss and Waste Reduction (SAVE FOOD), OzHarvest will be organising the Think.Eat.Save event to raise awareness on global food loss and waste reduction. The event also contributes to the FAO-UNEP Sustainable Food Systems Programme.

Food waste is currently costing Australians up to $10 billion each year, while two million people still rely on food relief.

Mon, 25 – Think.Eat.Save Brisbane @ Cathedral of St Stephen, 11:30am – 2:30 pm 

RSVP via Eventbrite: eventbrite.com.au/e/thinkeatsave-2016-brisbane-event-presented-by-ozharvest-tickets-26091457251

Thurs, 17 – Sun, 27 July – Night Noodle Markets @ South Bank, 5pm – 10pm nightly

OzHarvest volunteers will be at the Night Noodle Markets at South Bank spreading awareness about food rescue, food waste and sustainability. Say hello!

More info: brisbanetimesgoodfoodmonth2017.floktu.com/eventdetails

Thai & Australian chefs together with UNEP unite to fight food waste

Posted by on November 24, 2015

The UN Environment Programme Asia Pacific has enlisted the support of Australian food rescue organisation, OzHarvest, to educate and raise awareness about the issues of global food waste, food security and sustainability.

To support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 12.3, which aims to halve global food waste and reduce food losses along the production and supply chains by 2030, UNEP & OzHarvest have partnered with some of Bangkok’s most recognised chefs and will serve 2,030 people a delicious lunch prepared using saved ingredients otherwise destined for landfill.

Prominent Thai chefs including Duangporn ‘Bo’ Songvisava and Dylan ‘Lan’ Jones of Bo.lan restaurant, together with a team of chefs from Nahm including Chris Miller, as well as influential Wonderfruit Festival Co-Founder Pete Phornprapha and Dusit International’s Siradej Donavanik, will unite with UN delegates, and policymakers to fight food waste at Bangkok’s ‘Think.Eat.Save’ event on Thursday, 3 December at Parc Paragon, Siam Paragon between 12pm – 2pm.

An exciting and delicious fusion “rescued” menu will showcase the creativity of the booming Thai food industry. One example of the flavoursome feast is The Grand Hyatt Erawan Bangkok, whose chefs are set to produce at least 400 “repurposed” beef burgers made from saved beef trimmings with a som tum relish.

The Think.Eat.Save campaign of the Save Food Initiative to reduce food loss and waste is a partnership between UNEP, the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization and Messe Düsseldorf, in support of the UN Secretary-General’s Zero Hunger Challenge. The lunch is modelled on OzHarvest’s annual ‘Think.Eat.Save’ events, which feed thousands of people across Australia while raising awareness about global food waste.

Widespread support was garnered across all industries including from Siam Paragon as Venue Partner. Thai chefs, food industry and the fast growing sustainability sector were also quick to get on board the global movement including renowned Dusit Thani College, Grand Hyatt Erawan Bangkok, Plaza Athénée Bangkok, A Royal Méridien Hotel, Chateaux de Bangkok, Metropolitan by Como, Jagota, Raita Organics, organisers of the Wonderfruit Festival movement, Sasin Centre for Sustainability, chefs from nahm, La Monita, Osito, Opposite Mess Hall and Oyster Bar and as well as food companies such as Kim Chua Group, Thai Shing Ye, Marion’s Kitchen and many more.

An expert panel discussion on the issues of food waste, food security and food sustainability will inspire thought, debate and action while delicious meals made from rescued and donated food items will be served by top chefs.

Follow @ozharvest @UNEPAsiaPacific #thinkeatsave #thinkeatsavebkk on social media for more updates!

To attend Bangkok event click here http://thinkeatsavebkk.eventbrite.com.au/

 

Marion Grasby

Marion Grasby set to serve up some delicious ‘rescued’ meals to the Thai public at Think.Eat.Save 2015 Bangkok

We need to respect our food more, a Think.Eat.Save. blog

Posted by on July 31, 2015

Think. Eat. Save. Panel Discussion 2015

To capture the key points made during the Think.Eat.Save panel discussion in Adelaide, we asked OzHarvest casual driver and journalism student Simon Delaine to write a blog for us. The key message: we need to respect our food more!

The panel discussion at this year’s THINK.EAT.SAVE, held on Monday 27th July, brought together five food industry experts to discuss the issues surrounding food waste. These experts included our very own state manager of OzHarvestSA, Hayley Everuss; The National Wine Centre’s Executive Chef Tze Khaw; Chef and Creative Director of Tasting Australia, Simon Bryant; The Productive Garden Company’s Nick Thwaites;  and Feast Fine Food’s Richard Gunner.

The panel discussion was a way to get people to think about the intricacies of food waste and it was captivating to listen to five industry experts talk about something they are so passionate about; food. A point which came up over and over in the discussion was the fact that we need to respect our food more. No food needs to be thrown away. As Tze Khaw said, the worst case scenario for food is for it to be fed to the worm farm. Richard Gunner (the resident meat expert) mentioned that there is a lot of flavour in the bones of animals, which can be used to make stock. Meat is understandably more important than other categories of food when it comes to waste, since an animal’s life is involved. So learning how to make use of as much of the body as possible will go a long way in showing respect for the animal and reducing waste.

Nick Thwaites (the resident vege expert) work revolves around getting kids involved in growing their own food. He said education can produce lifelong benefits, especially around food waste.

“If a kid learns what it takes to grow food, then they’re more likely to respect the food” he said.

This isn’t specific to kids however, and it seems much food wastage can be avoided if people learn where their food comes from and stop taking it for granted.

Being clever and smart about food preparation was also a key theme of the discussion. Simon Bryant said that we need to make plans, ignore the trends and go speak to our grandma for advice instead of the mainstream media. In summary, make a plan for the week, stick to it, and keep things simple.

Simon also brought up a very interesting point on the use of best before and use by codes. He said the codes are outrageous and that we should put our five senses to use instead. This was another point which came up over and over. We need to be more accountable for our own health. Bar codes are obviously a necessity in the minds of food producers but we, as consumers, shouldn’t rely solely on them to identify whether the food is good or not. Use your senses, give it a sniff.

Another topic which came up was that we simply don’t need to eat all that much food. Tze said our bodies don’t need that much protein. We only need less than 100g per day. So when you compare this to some restaurant servings, it’s easy to see we often have too much. Hayley said that when she goes out to restaurants, she often shares meals, instead of having one each.

To wrap up the discussion, three final tips from the panellists were:

  • Use more of what’s in the fridge before going shopping.
  • Everything is edible, find a way to use it.
  • Everyone can put something into place to make a difference and fight food waste.

OzHarvest and the United Nations call on Australia’s leaders to set a target to reduce food waste by 50 per cent by 2025

Posted by on July 27, 2015

MEDIA RELEASE – JUNE 4

Canberra launch: Thursday, 4 June

National Think.Eat.Save event: Monday, 27 July

For the third year, Australia’s leading food rescue organisation OzHarvest will be teaming up with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the UN’s Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Global Initiative on Food Loss and Waste Reduction (SAVE FOOD) to lead the Think.Eat.Save campaign in Australia and raise awareness on global food loss and waste reduction, launching today on the eve of World Environment Day at Parliament House, Canberra.

This year, the campaign will launch at the nation’s capital and culminate in the national Think.Eat.Save event taking place across seven Australian cities (capital and regional) on July 27. Thousands of members of the public across capital cities will be served a free hot meal including surplus soup and rescued stews made from produce that would have otherwise ended up as landfill.

 

In a welcome display of cross-party support, Environment Minister the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Shadow Environment, Climate Change and Water Minister the Hon Mark Butler MP, Deputy Greens Leader Senator Larissa Waters, UNIC Director Christopher Woodthorpe and OzHarvest CEO and Founder Ronni Kahn will come together to launch the 2015 Think.Eat.Save campaign, bringing attention to the impact of global food waste and raising national debate on how food sustainability and food security can be addressed at a local level.

 

A delicious lunch made from rescued surplus food will be prepared and served to close to 100 Parliamentarians, Senators, Ministers and community leaders created by IHG chefs together with OzHarvest’s Chef for a Cause showing that good surplus food need not be wasted.

 

Members of the public will also be encouraged to make a personal pledge to reduce food waste through a digital Think.Eat.Save campaign launching on the same day. Pledges can be made online at http://thinkeatsave.ozharvest.org or via social media by posting an image of an ‘X’ made from utensils or food items to represent stopping food waste and by using the hashtag #thinkeatsave.

 

July 27 will see Think.Eat.Save events across the country showcasing some of the nation’s top chefs, politicians and celebrity identities uniting to take a stance against food waste, which is currently costing Australians up to $10 billion each year. The public are invited to enjoy a free, delicious and hearty hot meal made from rescued produce, learn more about reducing waste and pledge their commitment to #thinkeatsave.

 

Founder and CEO of OzHarvest, Ronni Kahn, said the aim of Think.Eat.Save 2015 is to bring attention to the alarming amount of food wasted in Australia and around the world, where roughly one third of food produced for human consumption (approx. 1.3 billion tonnes) is wasted or lost[1] along the way.

 

“We are all responsible and accountable for the food produced, consumed and wasted on this planet. This year’s Think.Eat.Save campaign will bring awareness to issues of global food sustainability and security and encourage all Australians to take meaningful action to minimise food waste at a local level,” Kahn said.

 

“Today at Parliament House we ask our nation’s leaders to set a target to reduce food waste by 50 per cent in Australia by 2025. In doing so, Australia will join forward-thinking nations who have chosen to take similar action. This year, we call on Australians to take the Think.Eat.Save pledge and be part of this movement.”

Naysan Sahba, Director of Communications of UNEP said, “Research shows that the world produces more food than is actually needed; food that is lost along the supply chain or wasted is due to poor consumption decisions. Cutting the rate of food loss and waste in half by 2050 would close 20 per cent of the food gap, according to studies by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and UNEP. We need to take immediate action to save food, improve livelihoods and conserve the environment. Solutions and opportunities exist. But we need to seize the moment and create the needed momentum.

“To bring about the vision of a truly sustainable world, we need to transform the way we produce and consume our food, which effectively means the way we consume our natural resources. This is what we at UNEP and our partners like OzHarvest are striving to influence with the Think.Eat.Save campaign and we thank OzHarvest for continuing to champion the campaign in Australia and beyond.”

PARLIAMENT HOUSE CANBERRA LAUNCH

DATE & TIME: Thursday, 4 June from 12.00pm to 1.00pm

LOCATION: House of Representatives Alcove, Parliament House, Canberra Australia
NATIONAL THINK.EAT.SAVE PUBLIC EVENTS

DATE & TIME: Monday, 27 July from 11.30am – 2.30pm

LOCATIONS

Sydney event: Martin Place, Sydney

Adelaide event: The University of Adelaide Goodman Lawns, North Terrace

Brisbane event: St Stephen’s Cathedral, Brisbane

Canberra event: Garema Place, Canberra

Gold Coast event: The 4217, Surfers Paradise

Melbourne event: Federation Square, Melbourne

Newcastle event: University of Newcastle
Perth & Regional Areas: locations to be confirmed

 

For a full list of events and information, please visit www.ozharvest.org

Follow us on Twitter @OzHarvest or Facebook or call 1800 108 006

Social media tags: #ozharvest #thinkeatsave

@UNEP #SaveFood #UNFAO #FoodWaste @FAOKnowledge @FAOnews @save_food_news

 

For more media information, images or interviews with Ronni Kahn, Founder and CEO of OzHarvest, please contact:

Louise Tran at OzHarvest on louise.tran@ozharvest.org | +61 2 9516 3877 | +61 466 620 744

Claudia Hackworth at Liquid Ideas on claudiahackworth@liquidideas.com.au | +61 2 9667 4211 | +61 417 012 512

 

Local food facts

·         Australians throw out $8-10 billion of food every year. As a nation we waste four million tonnes per annum of food which ends up in landfill.[2]

·         Australians throw out one out of every five shopping bags, which equates to every Australian household throwing out $1,036 worth of groceries each year. [3]

·         Australia produces enough food to feed approx. 60 million people, yet two million people still rely on food relief every year.[4]

·         Food relief agencies are not able to meet demand. Nearly 90% of agencies reported not having enough food to meet total demand. 6 in 10 agencies require at least 25% more food with almost 3 in 10 agencies requiring double the food. [5]

 

Global food loss and waste facts

·         Roughly one third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year — approximately 1.3 billion tonnes — gets lost or wasted.[6]

·         Every year, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food (222 million tonnes) as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa (230 million tonnes). [7]

·         Food loss and waste also amount to a major squandering of resources, including water, land, energy, labour and capital and needlessly produce greenhouse gas emissions, contributing to global warming and climate change. [8]

·         While the planet is struggling to provide us with enough resources to sustain its 7 billion people (growing to 9 billion by 2050), FAO estimates that a third of global food production is either wasted or lost. Food waste is an enormous drain on natural resources and a contributor to negative environmental impacts.

·         If food is wasted, it means that all the resources and inputs used in the production of all the food are also lost. For example, it takes about 1,000 litres of water to produce 1 litre of milk and about 16,000 litres goes into a cow’s food to make a hamburger. The resulting greenhouse gas emissions from the cows themselves, and throughout the food supply chain, all end up in vain when we waste food.

·         Given this enormous imbalance in lifestyles and the resultant devastating effects on natural resources and the environment, this year’s theme – Think.Eat.Save – Reduce Your Foodprint – encourages you to become more aware of the impacts of your food choices and empowers you to make informed decisions.
For more information visit www.thinkeatsave.org

 

 

About FAO

Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO’s efforts – to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives. FAO’s three main goals are: eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition; elimination of poverty and the driving forward of economic and social progress for all; and, sustainable management and utilization of natural resources, including land, water, air, climate and genetic resources for the benefit of present and future generations. Visit: www.fao.org

 

About SAVE FOOD: Global Initiative on Food Loss and Waste Reduction In May 2011 FAO launched the Global Initiative on food loss and waste reduction (also called SAVE FOOD Initiative) as a corporate effort together with the private sector trade fair organizer Messe Düsseldorf GmbH (Germany). SAVE FOOD works in partnership with donors, bi- and multi-lateral agencies, financial institutions, public, private sector and civil society for: (i) Awareness raising; (ii) Collaboration and coordination of world-wide initiatives; (iii) Evidence-based policy, strategy and programme development, including a methodology for assessing food loss; (iv) Technical support to investment programmes and projects. UNEP joined SAVE FOOD by launching the Think.Eat.Save Campaign in January 2013. Visit: www.fao.org/save-food

 

In August 2013 the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific launched the SAVE FOOD Asia-Pacific Campaign in Bangkok, Thailand. Strategic action areas identified through consultations: awareness raising, the relevant role of the private sector and support mechanisms by governments in order to facilitate smallholder effective organization along with the role played by consumers. Visit: http://www.savefood.net/

 

About the FAO-UNEP Sustainable Food Systems Programme

The FAO/UNEP sustainable food systems program is catalysing partnerships among United Nations agencies, governments, private sector and civil society to promote activities that improve the sustainability of food consumption and production. Visit: http://www.fao.org/ag/ags/sustainable-food-consumption-and-production/en

 

In June 2012 on the occasion of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), the U.N. Secretary General launched the Zero Hunger Challenge[9] which includes addressing sustainability of all food systems and the aim of zero food loss and waste. The Committee on World Food Security (CFS)[10], the foremost intergovernmental body for food security and nutrition, at its thirty-ninth Session (October 2012), requested its High Level Panel of Experts on food security and nutrition (HLPE)[11] to prepare a report on Food losses and waste in the context of sustainable food systems to inform the discussions in Plenary in October 2014. In May 2014 HLPE released the summary and recommendations of its report[12].

[1] FAO, 2011, Global food losses and food waste – Extent, causes and prevention, Rome. Food loss (FL): The decrease in quantity or quality of food. FL is mainly caused by the functioning of the food production and supply system or its institutional and legal framework. An important part of food loss is called food waste (FW) which refers to the removal from the supply chain of food which is fit for consumption by choice or has been left to spoil or expire as a result of negligence – predominantly but not exclusively the final consumer at household level. Source: FAO 2014
[2] Foodwise, www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-08/food-waste-value-australia/4993930
[3] Food Waste Avoidance Benchmark Study 2009
[4] DAFF, National Food Plan 2012
[5] End Hunger Report, Foodbank, 2012
[6] FAO, 2011, Global food losses and food waste – Extent, causes and prevention, Rome
[7] FAO, 2011, Global food losses and food waste – Extent, causes and prevention, Rome
[8] FAO, 2011, Global food losses and food waste – Extent, causes and prevention, Rome
[9] Visit: Zero Hunger Challenge
[10] Visit: Committee on World Food Security (CFS)
[11] Visit: High Level Panel of Experts on food security and nutrition (HLPE)
[12] Visit:http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/hlpe/hlpe_documents/HLPE_S_and_R/HLPE_2014_Food_Losses_and_Waste_Summary_EN.pdf

 

THINK.EAT.SAVE. 2015

Posted by on June 19, 2015

OzHarvest, as the official Australian partner of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is privileged to be part of the UNEP global campaign against food waste – THINK.EAT.SAVE.

On Monday 27th July, OzHarvest will hold, for the third year, THINK.EAT.SAVE simultaneously around Australia in; Brisbane, Canberra, Goldcoast, Melbourne, Newcastle, Perth, Sydney and here in Adelaide. (more…)

OzHarvest teams up with the UN to address food and nutrition security and sustainable food systems

Posted by on July 12, 2014

For the second year running, Australia’s leading food rescue organisation, OzHarvest is partnering with the United Nations to tackle the issues of food and nutrition security and sustainable food systems at the upcoming Think.Eat.Save events to be held across the country on Monday, 21 July.

Collaborating with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the UN’s Food Agriculture Organisation (FAO) Global Initiative on Food Loss and Waste Reduction (SAVE FOOD), OzHarvest will be leading the Think.Eat.Save campaign in Australia to raise awareness on global food loss and waste reduction. The events also contribute to the FAO-UNEP Sustainable Food Systems Programme.

Some of the nation’s top chefs, politicians and celebrities will unite at events held across Sydney, Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne and Newcastle to take a stance against food waste, and serve thousands of members of the public a free, delicious and hearty hot meal made from surplus produce that would have otherwise ended up as landfill.

Food waste is currently costing Australians up to $10 billion each year, while two million people still rely on food relief.

Founder and CEO of OzHarvest, Ronni Kahn said the aim of Think.Eat.Save 2014 is to bring attention to the disturbing amount of food wasted in Australia and around the world, where roughly one third of food produced for human consumption (approx. 1.3 billion tonnes) gets wasted and lost along the way.

Our modern day challenge is to create a sustainable food culture that can be shared by all, where we waste less at all levels of food production, distribution and consumption.

Each and every one of us can make a pledge to reduce food waste by participating in local Think.Eat.Save events, and also commit to reducing food waste at home. Small actions can affect change and united, our actions will make a huge positive impact on our planet. – Ronni Kahn.

In the next few years, food consumption is expected to increase by around 30 per cent due to population growth, while the effects of climate change are expected to reduce agricultural yields by up to 5 per cent in some areas. We do know, however, that cutting the rate of food loss and waste in half by 2050 would close 20 per cent of this food gap.

To bring about the vision of a truly sustainable world, we need to transform the way we produce and consume our food, which effectively means the way we consume our natural resources. This is what we at UNEP and our partners like OzHarvest are striving to influence with the Think.Eat.Save campaign and we thank OzHarvest for continuing to champion the campaign in Australia and beyond. – Naysan Sahba, Director of Communications of UNEP

A number of leaders and experts in the field of food waste, sustainability and food and nutrition security will debate these issues in a panel discussion at the Sydney and Adelaide events.

DATE & TIME: Monday, 21 July from 11.30am – 2.30pm, various locations

RSVP & PLEDGE HERE: www.ozharvest.eventbrite.com.au

LOCATIONS:

  • Sydney event: Martin Place, Sydney
  • Adelaide event: The University of Adelaide, Adelaide
  • Brisbane event: St Stephen’s Cathedral, Brisbane
  • Melbourne event: Federation Square, Melbourne
  • Newcastle event: Hunter St Mall, Newcastle

Follow us on Twitter @OzHarvest or Facebook or call 1800 108 006

Social media tags: #ozharvest #thinkeatsave @UNEP #SaveFood #UNFAO #FoodWaste @FAOKnowledge @FAOnews @save_food_news

For more media information, images or interviews with Ronni Kahn, Founder and CEO of OzHarvest, or panel experts please contact:

Louise Tran at OzHarvest on louise.tran@ozharvest.org | +61 2 9516 3877 | +61 466 620 744

Sascha Ryner at Liquid Ideas on sascharyner@liquidideas.com.au | +61 2 9667 4211 | +61 416 858 419

Local food facts

  • Australians throw out $8-10 billion of food every year. As a nation we waste four million tonnes per annum of food which ends up in landfill.
  • Australians throw out one out of every five shopping bags, which equates to every Australian household throwing out $1,036 worth of groceries each year.
  • Australia produces enough food to feed approx. 60 million people, yet two million people still rely on food relief every year.
  • Food relief agencies are not able to meet demand. Nearly 90% of agencies reported not having enough food to meet total demand. 6 in 10 agencies require at least 25% more food with almost 3 in 10 agencies requiring double the food.

Global food loss and waste facts

  • Roughly one third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year — approximately 1.3 billion tonnes — gets lost or wasted.
  • Every year, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food (222 million tonnes) as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa (230 million tonnes).
  • Food loss and waste also amount to a major squandering of resources, including water, land, energy, labour and capital and needlessly produce greenhouse gas emissions, contributing to global warming and climate change.
  • While the planet is struggling to provide us with enough resources to sustain its 7 billion people (growing to 9 billion by 2050), FAO estimates that a third of global food production is either wasted or lost. Food waste is an enormous drain on natural resources and a contributor to negative environmental impacts.
  • If food is wasted, it means that all the resources and inputs used in the production of all the food are also lost. For example, it takes about 1,000 litres of water to produce 1 litre of milk and about 16,000 litres goes into a cow’s food to make a hamburger. The resulting greenhouse gas emissions from the cows themselves, and throughout the food supply chain, all end up in vain when we waste food. Given this enormous imbalance in lifestyles and the resultant devastating effects on natural resources and the environment, this year’s theme – Think.Eat.Save – Reduce Your Foodprint – encourages you to become more aware of the impacts of your food choices and empowers you to make informed decisions.

For more information visit www.thinkeatsave.org

About FAO

Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO’s efforts – to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives. FAO’s three main goals are: eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition; elimination of poverty and the driving forward of economic and social progress for all; and, sustainable management and utilization of natural resources, including land, water, air, climate and genetic resources for the benefit of present and future generations. Visit: www.fao.org

About SAVE FOOD: Global Initiative on Food Loss and Waste Reduction In May 2011 FAO launched the Global Initiative on food loss and waste reduction (also called SAVE FOOD Initiative) as a corporate effort together with the private sector trade fair organizer Messe Düsseldorf GmbH (Germany). SAVE FOOD works in partnership with donors, bi- and multi-lateral agencies, financial institutions, public, private sector and civil society for: (i) Awareness raising; (ii) Collaboration and coordination of world-wide initiatives; (iii) Evidence-based policy, strategy and programme development, including a methodology for assessing food loss; (iv) Technical support to investment programmes and projects. UNEP joined SAVE FOOD by launching the Think.Eat.Save Campaign in January 2013. Visit: www.fao.org/save-food

In August 2013 the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific launched the SAVE FOOD Asia-Pacific Campaign in Bangkok, Thailand. Strategic action areas identified through consultations: awareness raising, the relevant role of the private sector and support mechanisms by governments in order to facilitate smallholder effective organization along with the role played by consumers. Visit: http://www.savefood.net/

About the FAO-UNEP Sustainable Food Systems Programme

The FAO/UNEP sustainable food systems program is catalysing partnerships among United Nations agencies, governments, private sector and civil society to promote activities that improve the sustainability of food consumption and production. Visit: http://www.fao.org/ag/ags/sustainable-food-consumption-and-production/en

In June 2012 on the occasion of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), the U.N. Secretary General launched the Zero Hunger Challenge9 which includes addressing sustainability of all food systems and the aim of zero food loss and waste. The Committee on World Food Security (CFS)10, the foremost intergovernmental body for food security and nutrition, at its thirty-ninth Session (October 2012), requested its High Level Panel of Experts on food security and nutrition (HLPE)11 to prepare a report on Food losses and waste in the context of sustainable food systems to inform the discussions in Plenary in October 2014. In May 2014 HLPE released the summary and recommendations of its report12.